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August 15, 2019 by Sheila Hamilton & Cindy Marty Hadge | Beyond Well: Science

A life worth living

We are all on a spectrum of mental health and everyone will struggle at some point in their life. Let’s build a toolbox for living better.

Beyond Well: Science With Sheila Hamilton is here to explore our understanding of mental health challenges and what we’re learning about ways to help ourselves and others navigate and grow through them.

In this episode, Sheila talks with Cindy Marty Hadge about how a Hearing Voices support group in her neighborhood helped her move from a place of despair to a life of purpose and connection.

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August 5, 2019 by Andrea Zwicknagl

What if…

What if...

Andrea Zwicknagl’s presentation at the kickoff meeting of HOPEnDialogue, a new Open Dialogue international research collaborative, in Rome, Italy, July 2, 2019. Read by Guiseppe Salamina in her absence.

To learn more and to support this project, please visit https://mental-health-excellence.networkforgood.com/projects/72234-open-dialogue-research-development

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August 1, 2019 by Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care

Beyond Well: Science podcast Ep.2- A psychiatrist’s road to Open Dialogue

We are all on a spectrum of mental health and everyone will struggle at some point in their life. Let’s build a toolbox for living better. Beyond Well: Science With Sheila Hamilton is here to explore our understanding of mental health challenges and what we’re learning about ways help ourselves and others to navigate and grow through them.

In this episode, Sheila talks with psychiatrist and the Foundation’s Vice Chair Chris Gordon about his path to Open Dialogue practice and how he has integrated the approach into his community mental health program and into his teaching at Harvard Medical School, MacLean and Mass General.

If you enjoy this podcast, become a sustaining partner today with an easy monthly donation.

 

 

Corporate sponsors are welcome and donors of $75,000 or more will receive special invitations to meet Sheila’s celebrity guests in studio as well as dinner with Sheila and Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care CEO, Gina Nikkel, PhD.

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July 24, 2019 by Bob Nikkel, MSW

Responding to “The Case Against AOT”

Next Steps for Change

Robert Whitaker and Michael Simonson produced an essential review and critique of forced outpatient interventions in their July 14 article, “Twenty Years After Kendra’s Law:  The Case Against AOT.”

Bob has sometimes been criticized for not advocating more on the issues he raises.  The way I see it, that is not his job as an investigative medical journalist.  That is the job of his readers.

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July 21, 2019 by Christopher Gordon, MD

Reflections on Rome

Kickoff of the New Open Dialogue International Research Collaborative: Hopes for HOPEnDialogue

On July 2 and 3, 2019, I was privileged to attend the first meeting of the HOPEnDialogue International Research Collaborative in Rome.  I attended as a representative of the Board of the Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care, along with the Foundation’s President and CEO, Gina Nikkel, and the Foundation’s new Chief Philanthropy Officer, Kevin Aspegren.

The meeting was hosted by the leaders of the project, Raffaella Pocobello and Giuseppe Salamina, and brought together forty representatives from 12 countries, first in an open forum to discuss the goals and overarching strategy of the project, and a second day for the 20 international members of the Advisory Council to address more focused challenges, such as site selection requirements; inclusion/exclusion criteria; training; fidelity; and outcomes.

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June 28, 2019 by Foundation for Excellence in Mental Health Care

Holistic Options for ADHD Treatment

‘Micronutrients for ADHD Youth’ Study Now Enrolling Participants


Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the presence of the behaviors of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and poor attention. The root causes and best solutions for these troubling behaviors will vary from child to child.

Parents concerned about the safety and effectiveness of popular drug treatments can try some promising alternatives with a significantly lower risk of unwanted side effects. Many have found psychotherapy and parent training highly effective in resolving troubling behavior and improving their child’s social skills and relationships with peers.

For some, micronutrient supplements have been life-changing:

The Micronutrients for ADHD Youth study is now accepting new participants, with sites at Oregon Health & Science University, The Ohio State University in Columbus, and University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. Eligible children are age 6-12 and have not been on ADHD medications for two weeks before their participation begins.

Contact lead researcher, Jeanette Johnstone, PhD, at  503-494-3700 or healthykids@ohsu.edu if you are within driving distance of Portland, Oregon.

If you are near Columbus, OH, contact E. Arnold, MD at OSUMC-maddystudy@osu.edu

If you are near Lethbridge, Alberta, contact B. Leung, PhD at healthykids@uleth.edu

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March 12, 2019 by Bob Nikkel, MSW

National Basketball and Peer Supports

I see eye-to-eye with most players in the National Basketball Association.  Recently I proved this by a random meeting with two guys in the Portland airport who were just a shade taller than I am–one was a former NBA player and the other a current member of the Portland Trailblazers.  6-10 and 6-11, respectively.

So you are asking, what does this NBA stuff have to do with peer support?
Adam Silver, the commissioner of the NBA was interviewed recently and talked about the number of NBA players, who in spite of their athletic success–and I might add, their million dollar plus contracts–deal with a lot of unhappiness in their personal lives.
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February 8, 2019 by Alita Kathryn Taylor, MA, LMFT

Love Is In the Air…

I am in love.  I’m in love with this way of working.  And I won’t stop.  Open Dialogue Washington began in 2018 upon my graduation/commencement from Jaakko Seikkula’s dialogic approaches to couple and family therapy trainer/supervisor training, in collaboration with Dialogic Partners and the University of Jyväskylä.

In 2016, I embarked to partake in the best training course I had ever experienced as a family therapist.  The embodiment I experienced working with my Open Dialogue colleagues felt like the missing key in psychiatry and psychotherapy.  Something intangible, yet what I knew all along.  Something ineffable, yet also a shared language.  Something deeply and autonomically human, yet unrepeatable and fleeting.   It led me onto a moment-by-moment path where everything I learned in my 27-year long career about systemic family therapy and emergency psychiatric protocols ebbed, and the present moment of love flowed, neither the ebbing knowledge nor the cresting wisdom having any lesser value than the other.  The complete work we do in mental health care is this ocean of love.

We are in constant change when we are in crisis.   Timelessness sets in.  Growth is happening.  We don’t exactly know what we need.  That is what mental health work is, sitting with this human happening.  In the in-between space something happens, and we don’t know what will.  This is the paradox.  We are navigating the ebb and flow of incoming knowledge we have from research and the ebb and flow in each patient and family’s difficulties (the meanings they make of them.)

“It cannot be taught, but it needs a teacher.”

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February 1, 2019 by Anne Cooke | Mental Health Today

Mental health education in schools – what’s not to like?

Mental health lessons are coming to the national curriculum next year [2020]. Teachers should be empowered to acknowledge that mental health is a contested area, argues psychologist and lecturer Anne Cooke. Ask students what they think, encourage critical thinking and enquiry…

Darn, I missed the boat. The government’s consultation on its new proposal for mental health education in schools closed in November, and I didn’t know it was happening. Am I alone in thinking that consultations are often too perfunctory, too brief, and only ask the questions to which the government thinks it already knows the answers?

I’m disappointed, because while many of the proposals are great, the stuff on mental health begs some important questions. Including the big one: what does ‘mental health’ actually mean?

What is a mental health problem? Are some of us mentally well and others of us mentally ill – because something has gone wrong in our brain that needs fixing by an expert? Or are we all just different, with different experiences, different areas of strength and difficulty, and all, at any one point in time, somewhere on a spectrum of wellbeing? And, if, as they do, experts differ in their views on these questions, what is ‘mental health education’ actually educating students about? That we all experience distress and need to look out for each other?  Or that we need to be alert to signs of an underlying disease process and refer to the experts?

The draft guidance suggests that school pupils should be given ‘factual information about the prevalence and characteristics of more serious mental health conditions’, and ‘should be enabled to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate’.

I always feel a bit wary when read statements like that. The problem is: mental health is a contested area. Scientists and clinicians don’t agree about what the ‘facts’ are, or about what is ‘appropriate’.

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January 30, 2019 by Mary Olson, PhD

The History of the Open Dialogue Approach in the United States

Presented at the World Open Dialogue Conference, Tokyo and Kyoto, Japan, February 2019.

I wish to thank Nazlim Hagmann MD for her invaluable feedback on an earlier draft of this essay.

“Open Dialogue”—a network approach to severe psychiatric crises developed at Keropudas Hospital in Tornio, Finland–first began to attract notable attention in the United States a decade ago, although many ideas and practices that influenced its evolution in Finland actually came from the US. In particular, the Finnish team refined and advanced elements of US family therapy. Among these US linkages are Gregory Bateson’s Palo Alto research on family communication (1952-1962); Ross Speck and Carolyn Attneave’s network therapy for schizophrenia that flourished in the late sixties at the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic, and Harry Goolishian and Harlene Anderson’s collaborative-language approach that emerged in the eighties at the Galveston Institute in Texas. While holding in mind that Open Dialogue is indebted to these and other US ancestors, this brief essay will focus on the recent wave of interest in the Finnish approach.

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